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Polish translation of “fall”

fall

verb [I]
 
 
/fɔːl/ (past tense fell, past participle fallen)
MOVE DOWN A2 to move down towards the ground
spadać, padać
Huge drops of rain were falling from the sky. By winter, all the leaves had fallen off the trees.Falling and droppingMoving downwards
STOP STANDING B1 to suddenly go down and hit the ground without intending to
spadać, upadać
She fell off her bike and broke her arm.Falling and droppingMoving downwards
BECOME LESS B1 to become less in number or amount
opadać
Housing prices have fallen by 15% since last year. Temperatures are expected to fall from 15°C to 9°C.Becoming and making smaller or lessBecoming and making less strong
BECOME WORSE to become worse, or start to be in a bad situation or condition
podupadać
Education standards are continuing to fall. Empty for 30 years, the building had fallen into ruin (= become very damaged).Deteriorating and making worse
fall asleep/ill/still, etc B1 to start to sleep/become ill/become quiet, etc
zasnąć/zachorować/zamilknąć itp.
I fell asleep on the sofa watching TV.Starting and beginningStarting again
darkness/night falls literary used to say that it is becoming dark
zapada zmierzch/noc
ChangingAdapting and modifying Adapting and attuning to somethingChanging frequently
LOSE POWER to lose power and start to be controlled by a different leader
upadać
In 1453 the city fell to the Turks.Stopping fightingFailing and doing badly
HANG DOWN to hang down
opadać
Her long blonde hair fell softly over her shoulders. → See also fall on deaf ears, fall flat, fall foul of sb/sth, go/fall to pieces, fall into place, fall prey to sth, fall by the waysideHanging and suspending
(Definition of fall verb from the Cambridge English-Polish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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