meet verb translate English to Polish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "meet" - English-Polish dictionary

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meet

verb
 
 
/miːt/ ( past tense and past participle met /met/)
COME TOGETHER [I, T] A1 to come to the same place as someone else by arrangement or by chance
spotykać (się)
We met for coffee last Sunday. I met my old English teacher while trekking in the Alps. Each student meets with an adviser at the start of the school year.Meeting peopleOfficial meetings
INTRODUCE [I, T] A1 to see and speak to someone for the first time
poznać (się)
I've always wanted to meet a movie star. "This is Helen." "Pleased to meet you."Meeting peopleOfficial meetings
GROUP [I] B1 If a group of people meet, they come to a place in order to do something.
zbierać się
The shareholders meet once a year to discuss profits.Meeting peopleOfficial meetings
PLACE [T] B1 to wait at a place for someone or something to arrive
odbierać, czekać na
They met me at the airport.Meeting peopleOfficial meetings
ENOUGH [T] to be a big enough amount or of a good enough quality for something
spełniać
This old building will never meet the new fire regulations. Can your product meet the needs of a wide range of consumers?Enough
ACHIEVE [T] to be able to achieve something
osiągać, wywiązywać się z
He met every goal he set for himself. to meet a deadline Succeeding, achieving and fulfilling
JOIN [I, T] to join something
łączyć się (z)
There's a large crack where the ceiling meets the wall. →  See also make ends meet Connecting and combiningVariety and mixturesMixing and mixtures
(Definition of meet verb from the Cambridge English-Polish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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