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Polish translation of “miss”

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miss

verb
 
 
/mɪs/
FEEL SAD [T] A2 to feel sad about someone that you do not see now or something that you do not have or do now
tęsknić za, ≈ brakować
I'll miss you when you go. [+ doing sth] He misses having a room of his own.Feeling sad and unhappy
NOT GO TO [T] A2 to not go to something
opuszczać, tracić
I missed my class this morning.Avoiding actionLaziness and lazy peopleAbsent
NOT SEE/HEAR [T] B1 to not see or hear something or someone
tracić, nie dosłyszeć, przeoczyć
Sorry, I missed that, could you repeat it please? We missed the first five minutes of the film.Failing and doing badly
NOT HIT [I, T] B2 to not hit or catch something as you intended
nie trafić (w/do)
It should have been such an easy goal and he missed.Failing and doing badly
TOO LATE [T] A2 to arrive too late to get on a bus, train, or aircraft
spóźnić się na
If I don't leave now, I'll miss my train.Failing and doing badly
NOT NOTICE [T] to not notice someone or something
nie zauważyć, przeoczyć
It's the big house on the corner - you can't miss it.Using the eyesEyesight, glasses and lensesThe eye and surrounding areaPerceptiveNot paying attentionTreating as unimportantNeglecting and ignoringUnaware
miss a chance/opportunity B1 to not use an opportunity to do something
przepuścić okazję
You can't afford to miss a chance like this.Failing and doing badly
miss the point to not understand something correctly
nie rozumieć, o co chodzi, nie dostrzegać istoty sprawy
→  See also miss the boat Failing and doing badlyMisunderstanding
(Definition of miss verb from the Cambridge English-Polish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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