miss verb - Definition in the Cambridge English-Polish Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Polish translation of “miss”

See all translations

miss

verb
 
 
/mɪs/
FEEL SAD [T] A2 to feel sad about someone that you do not see now or something that you do not have or do now
tęsknić za, ≈ brakować
I'll miss you when you go. [+ doing sth] He misses having a room of his own.Feeling sad and unhappy
NOT GO TO [T] A2 to not go to something
opuszczać, tracić
I missed my class this morning.Avoiding actionLaziness and lazy peopleAbsent
NOT SEE/HEAR [T] B1 to not see or hear something or someone
tracić, nie dosłyszeć, przeoczyć
Sorry, I missed that, could you repeat it please? We missed the first five minutes of the film.Failing and doing badly
NOT HIT [I, T] B2 to not hit or catch something as you intended
nie trafić (w/do)
It should have been such an easy goal and he missed.Failing and doing badly
TOO LATE [T] A2 to arrive too late to get on a bus, train, or aircraft
spóźnić się na
If I don't leave now, I'll miss my train.Failing and doing badly
NOT NOTICE [T] to not notice someone or something
nie zauważyć, przeoczyć
It's the big house on the corner - you can't miss it.Using the eyesEyesight, glasses and lensesThe eye and surrounding areaPerceptiveNot paying attentionTreating as unimportantNeglecting and ignoringUnaware
miss a chance/opportunity B1 to not use an opportunity to do something
przepuścić okazję
You can't afford to miss a chance like this.Failing and doing badly
miss the point to not understand something correctly
nie rozumieć, o co chodzi, nie dostrzegać istoty sprawy
→  See also miss the boat Failing and doing badlyMisunderstanding
(Definition of miss verb from the Cambridge English-Polish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “miss” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

kick off

the time when a game of football starts, or when it begins again after it has stopped because of a goal, etc.

Word of the Day

She’s got very good posture. (How we stand and sit)

by Liz Walter,
May 27, 2015
Recently on this blog, we looked at the words that we use to describe the way we move. This week we’re looking at words for describing our bodies when they are still, whether we are standing or sitting. Since most of us do far too much of this, let’s start with sitting.

Read More 

ancestral health noun

May 25, 2015
diet based on the presumed diet of our Palaeolithic ancestors ‘Ancestral health,’ to use a term popular among Paleo followers, has gone mass.

Read More