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Polish translation of “move”

move

verb
 
 
/muːv/
CHANGE PLACE [I] B1 If a person or an organization moves, they go to a different place to live or work.
przeprowadzać się, przenosić się, wyprowadzać się
Eventually, he moved to Germany. She's moving into a new apartment. Our children have all moved away.Changing homes and moving
POSITION [I, T] A2 to change place or position, or to make something change place or position
przenosić (się), przesuwać (się), ruszać (się)
We moved the chairs to another room. Someone was moving around upstairs.General words for movementTransferring and transporting objectsChangingAdapting and modifying Adapting and attuning to somethingChanging frequently
move ahead/along/forward, etc to make progress with something that you have planned to do
przystępować do realizacji
The department is moving ahead with changes to its teaching programme.Making progress and advancingBecoming better
ACTION [I] to take action
podejmować kroki
[+ to do sth] The company moved swiftly to find new products.Acting and actsDealing with things or people
TIME [T] to change the time or order of something
przesuwać
We need to move the meeting back a few days.ChangingAdapting and modifying Adapting and attuning to somethingChanging frequently
FEELING [T] B2 to make someone have strong feelings of sadness or sympathy
poruszać
[often passive] I was deeply moved by his speech. Many people were moved to tears (= were so sad they cried). → Compare unmovedMaking people sad, shocked and upsetStrong feelings
move house UK B1 to leave your home in order to live in a new one
przeprowadzać się, wyprowadzać się
Changing homes and moving
(Definition of move verb from the Cambridge English-Polish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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