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Polish translation of “next”

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next

adjective
 
 
/nekst/
next week/year/Monday, etc A1 the week/year/Monday, etc that follows the present one
w przyszłym tygodniu/roku/w przyszły poniedziałek itp.
I'm planning to visit California next year. Are you doing anything next Wednesday? Next time, ask my permission before you borrow the car.Before, after and alreadyAfter and behind
AFTER A2 The next time, event, person, or thing is the one nearest to now or the one that follows the present one.
następny, najbliższy
What time's the next train to London? We're going to be very busy for the next few months.In the future and soonBefore, after and alreadyAfter and behind
NEAR A2 The next place is the one nearest to the present one.
następny, najbliższy
She only lives in the next village. Turn left at the next roundabout.Next to and beside
the next best thing the thing that is best, if you cannot have or do the thing you really want
coś prawie tak dobre, drugi wybór
Coaching football is the next best thing to playing.Quite good, or not very goodSuitable and acceptable
the next thing I knew used to talk about part of a story that happens in a sudden and surprising way
zanim się spostrzegłem
A car came speeding round the corner, and the next thing I knew I was lying on the ground.Expressions of surprise
(Definition of next adjective from the Cambridge English-Polish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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