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Polish translation of “power”

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power

noun
 
 
/paʊər/
CONTROL [U] B2 control or influence over people and events
władza
He likes to have power over people.Power to control
POLITICS [U] B2 political control in a country
władza
They have been in power too long. When did this government come to power (= start to control the country)?Power to controlRuling and governing
ENERGY [U] B1 energy, usually electricity, that is used to provide light, heat, etc
energia, moc
nuclear power Turn off the power at the main switch.Electricity and electronicsEnergy, force and powerPower and intensity
COUNTRY [C] a country that has a lot of influence over others
mocarstwo, potęga
a major world powerDiplomacy and mediation
OFFICIAL RIGHT [C, U] an official or legal right to do something
uprawnienie, moc, władza
[+ to do sth] It's not in my power to stop him publishing this book.Power to control
STRENGTH [U] strength or force
siła, potęga
economic/military power Power and intensityEnergy, force and power
ABILITY [U] a natural ability
zdolność, umiejętność
to lose the power of speechSkill, talent and ability
do everything in your power to do sth to do everything that you are able and allowed to do
zrobić lub uczynić wszystko, co w czyjejś mocy
I've done everything in my power to help him.Trying and making an effortEffort and expending energy
the powers that be important people who have authority over others
władze
→  See also balance of power People in charge of or controlling other peopleBosses, managers and directors
(Definition of power noun from the Cambridge English-Polish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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