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Polish translation of “record”

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record

noun
 
 
/ˈrekɔːd/
STORED INFORMATION [C, U] B2 information that is written on paper or stored on computer so that it can be used in the future
zapis
medical/dental records My teacher keeps a record of my absences. This has been the hottest summer on record (= the hottest summer known about).Official documents
BEHAVIOUR [C] A person's or company's record is their behaviour or achievements.
wyniki, notowania, statystyki
[usually singular] She has an outstanding academic record (= has done very well in school). Of all airlines they have the best safety record.Success and achievementsHigher and lower points of achievementFailuresBehaving, interacting and behaviour
BEST [C] B1 the best, biggest, longest, tallest, etc
rekord
to set/break a record He holds the world record for 100 metres.Success and achievementsHigher and lower points of achievementFailuresMaximum and minimum
MUSIC [C] B1 a flat, round, plastic disc that music is stored on, used especially in the past
płyta
to play a recordRecording sounds and images
off the record If you say something off the record, you do not want the public to know about it.
nieoficjalnie
Secrecy and privacyOn or off
put/set the record straight to tell people the true facts about a situation
wyjaśniać nieporozumienia
True, real, false, and unrealReasons and explanations
COMPUTER a collection of pieces of information in a computer database that is treated as one unit
rekord
You can sort the records on any field. →  See also track record Computer concepts
(Definition of record noun from the Cambridge English-Polish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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