Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Polish translation of “sit”

sit

verb
 
 
/sɪt/ (present participle sitting, past tense and past participle sat)
BODY POSITION [I] A1 to be in a position with the weight of your body on your bottom and the top part of your body up, for example, on a chair
siedzieć
Emma was sitting on a stool. The children sat at the table by the window. We sat by the river and had a picnic.Sitting and standing
MOVE BODY [I] ( also sit down) A2 to move your body into a sitting position after you have been standing
siadać
She came over and sat beside him. She sat down on the grass. Sitting and standing
sit sb down/at/in, etc to make someone sit somewhere
posadzić kogoś gdzieś
She sat me down and told me the bad news. I thought we'd sit the children at the end of the table.Sitting and standing
STAY [I] to stay in one place for a long time and not be used
stać
He hardly ever drives the car. It just sits in the garage.Staying and remainingWaiting
MEETING [I] If a court, parliament, etc sits, it has a meeting to do its work.
obradować
The board will be sitting next week.Court cases, orders and decisionsOfficial meetingsMeeting people
TEST/EXAM [T] UK to take a test or exam
zdawać
The changes will affect many students sitting their exams this summer. → See also sit on the fenceExams, tests and exercises
(Definition of sit from the Cambridge English-Polish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Browse related topics

You are looking at an entry to do with Paying attention and being careful, but you might be interested in these topics from the Attention and care topic area:

Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “sit” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

wave

to raise your hand and move it from side to side as a way of greeting someone, telling someone to do something, or adding emphasis to an expression

Word of the Day

Come on – you can do it! Phrasal verbs with ‘come’.

by Liz Walter​,
November 19, 2014
As part of an occasional series on the tricky subject of phrasal verbs, this blog looks at ones formed with the verb ‘come’. If you are reading this blog, I’m sure you already know come from, as it is one of the first things you learn in class: I come from Scotland/Spain.

Read More 

silver splicer noun

November 17, 2014
informal a person who marries in later life Newly retired and now newlywed – rise of the ‘silver splicers’ Reaching pension age becomes a trigger to tie the knot as baby-boomers begin to redefine retirement

Read More