start verb translate English to Polish: Cambridge Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Translation of "start" - English-Polish dictionary

start

verb     /stɑːt/
BEGIN DOING [I, T]
A1 to begin doing something zaczynać [+ doing sth] He started smoking when he was eighteen. [+ to do sth] Maria started to laugh. We start work at nine o'clock.Starting and beginningStarting again
BEGIN HAPPENING [I, T]
B1 to begin to happen or to make something begin to happen zaczynać (się) The programme starts at seven o'clock. Police believe the fire started in the kitchen.Starting and beginningStarting againCausing things to happen
BUSINESS [I, T] ( also start up)
B2 If a business, organization, etc starts, it begins to exist, and if you start it, you make it begin to exist. powstawać, zakładać She started her own computer business. A lot of new restaurants have started up in the area.Starting, succeeding and failing in business
CAR [I, T] ( also start up)
B2 If a car or engine starts, it begins to work, and if you start it, you make it begin to work. włączać (się), uruchamiać (się) The car won't start. Start up the engine.Starting and beginningStarting againFunctioningPerforming a function
to start with
used to talk about what a situation was like at the beginning before it changed z lub na początku I was happy at school to start with, but later I hated it.Starting and beginningStarting again
used before saying the first thing in a list of things po pierwsze To start with, we need better computers. Then we need more training.First and firstly
MOVE SUDDENLY [I]
to move suddenly because you are frightened or surprised zrywać się, podskoczyć →  See also set/start the ball rolling , get/start off on the wrong foot Making short, sudden movements
(Definition of start verb from the Cambridge English-Polish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
by ,
May 24, 2016
by Colin McIntosh One of the many ways in which English differs from other languages is its use of uncountable nouns to talk about collections of objects: as well as never being used in the plural, they’re never used with a or an. Examples are furniture (plural in German and many other languages), cutlery (plural in Italian), and

Read More 

Word of the Day

parasol

a type of sunshade (= round frame covered in cloth on a stick) carried especially by women in the past, to give protection from the sun

Word of the Day

convo noun
convo noun
May 23, 2016
informal a conversation The convo around concussions mostly focuses on guys who play football, but Chastain thinks that this whole thing could be a headache for women too.

Read More