start verb translate English to Polish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "start" - English-Polish dictionary

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start

verb
 
 
/stɑːt/
BEGIN DOING [I, T] A1 to begin doing something
zaczynać
[+ doing sth] He started smoking when he was eighteen. [+ to do sth] Maria started to laugh. We start work at nine o'clock.Starting and beginningStarting again
BEGIN HAPPENING [I, T] B1 to begin to happen or to make something begin to happen
zaczynać (się)
The programme starts at seven o'clock. Police believe the fire started in the kitchen.Starting and beginningStarting againCausing things to happen
BUSINESS [I, T] ( also start up) B2 If a business, organization, etc starts, it begins to exist, and if you start it, you make it begin to exist.
powstawać, zakładać
She started her own computer business. A lot of new restaurants have started up in the area.Starting, succeeding and failing in business
CAR [I, T] ( also start up) B2 If a car or engine starts, it begins to work, and if you start it, you make it begin to work.
włączać (się), uruchamiać (się)
The car won't start. Start up the engine.Starting and beginningStarting againFunctioningPerforming a function
to start with used to talk about what a situation was like at the beginning before it changed
z lub na początku
I was happy at school to start with, but later I hated it.Starting and beginningStarting again
used before saying the first thing in a list of things
po pierwsze
To start with, we need better computers. Then we need more training.First and firstly
MOVE SUDDENLY [I] to move suddenly because you are frightened or surprised
zrywać się, podskoczyć
→  See also set/start the ball rolling , get/start off on the wrong foot Making short, sudden movements
(Definition of start verb from the Cambridge English-Polish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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