take translate English to Polish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "take" - English-Polish dictionary

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take

verb [T]
 
 
/teɪk/ ( past tense took, past participle taken)
CARRY A1 to get and carry something with you when you go somewhere
brać, zabierać
I always take my mobile phone with me.Taking and choosingTransferring and transporting objectsDelivering and despatching
GO A1 to go somewhere with someone, often paying for them or being responsible for them
brać, zabierać
I took the kids to the park.Taking someone somewhere or telling them the way
WITHOUT PERMISSION B1 to remove something without permission
brać, zabierać
Someone's taken my coat.Taking and choosingCapturing or taking possession of thingsGetting, receiving and accepting
GET HOLD B1 to get hold of something and move it
brać, zabierać
He reached across and took the glass from her.Taking and choosingTransferring and transporting objectsHaving in your hands
ACCEPT B1 to accept something
przyjmować
So, are you going to take the job? Do you take credit cards?Getting, receiving and acceptingCapturing or taking possession of things
NEED A2 If something takes a particular amount of time, or a particular quality, you need that amount of time or that quality in order to be able to do it.
zajmować, zabierać, wymagać
[+ to do sth] It's taken me three days to get here. It takes a lot of courage to stand up and talk in front of so many people.Essential or necessary
MEDICINE A2 to swallow or use medicine
brać
Take two tablets, three times a day.Administering drugs and medicines
MEASURE to measure something
mierzyć
Have you taken her temperature?Weighing and measuring
CLOTHES B1 to wear a particular size of clothes
nosić
I take a size 12 in trousers.Not wearing or removing clothes
SPACE to have enough space for a particular number of people or things
mieścić
There's six of us and the car only takes five.Area, mass, weight and volume in general
TRAVEL A2 to travel somewhere by using a bus, train, car, etc, or by using a particular road
jechać
Are you taking the train to Edinburgh?Travelling
take a break/rest, etc B1 to stop working for a period
robić przerwę/odpoczynek itp.
Time off work
take pleasure/pride/an interest, etc B2 to have a particular, good feeling about something that you do
znajdować przyjemność/być dumnym/interesować się itp.
I take great pleasure in cooking. These women take their jobs very seriously (= think their jobs are very important).Feelings - general words
take a look B1 to look at something
spoglądać
Take a look at these photos.Using the eyesEyesight, glasses and lensesThe eye and surrounding areaPerceptive
UNDERSTAND to understand something in a particular way
przyjmować, rozumieć
Whatever I say she'll take it the wrong way.Understanding and comprehending
I take it (that) used when you think that what you say is probably true
rozumiem, że
I take it you're not coming with us.Guesses and assumptions
can't take sth B2 to not be able to deal with an unpleasant situation
nie móc czegoś znieść, mieć czegoś dosyć
We argue all the time - I really can't take it any more.Coping and not copingDealing with things or peopleTolerating and enduring
take it from me accept that what I say is true, because I know or have experienced it
możesz mi wierzyć
You could be doing a much less interesting job, take it from me.True, real, false, and unreal
take sth as it comes to deal with something as it happens, without planning for it
radzić sobie z czymś na bieżąco
Not expected or planned
BY FORCE to get control of something by force
zajmować
By morning they had taken the city.Taking and choosingCapturing or taking possession of thingsGetting, receiving and accepting
(Definition of take from the Cambridge English-Polish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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