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Portuguese translation of “stand”

stand

verb
 
/stænd/ (present participle standing, past tense and past participle stood)
A2 to be in a vertical position on your feet
estar de pé
We stood there for an hour. He’s standing over there, next to Karen.
A2 (also stand up) to rise to a vertical position on your feet from sitting or lying down
levantar-se, ficar de pé
I get dizzy if I stand up too quickly. Please stand when the bride arrives.
to be in a particular place or position
ficar, encontrar-se
The tower stands in the middle of a field.
to put something in a particular place or position
pôr, colocar
She stood the umbrella by the door.
can’t stand someone/something informal B1 to hate someone or something
não suportar alguém/algo
I can’t stand him – he’s so rude! She can’t stand doing housework.
stand in someone’s way to try to stop or prevent
atrapalhar alguém
You know I won’t stand in your way if you want to apply for a job abroad.
standing on your head If you can do something standing on your head, you can do it very easily.
com os pés nas costas
It’s the sort of program Andrew could write standing on his head.
(Definition of stand verb from the Cambridge English-Portuguese Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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