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Portuguese translation of “take”

take

verb
 
/teɪk/ (present participle taking, past tense took, past participle taken)
A1 to get and carry something with you when you go somewhere
levar
I always take my umbrella with me.
A1 to go somewhere with someone, often paying for them
levar
We’re taking the kids to the circus on Saturday. I’m taking my wife to Florence for the weekend.
A2 to travel somewhere using a bus, train, car, etc.
pegar
He takes the bus to work. Are you taking the train to Paris?
A2 used to tell someone which road to go on or which turning to take in order to get somewhere
pegar
Take the third turning on the left. Take State St. down the hill to the traffic light.
A2 to do an exam or test
fazer
When are you taking your driving test?
A2 If something takes a particular amount of time, or you take a particular amount of time, you need that amount of time in order to be able to do it.
levar, demorar
It took me three days to get here. She took ages to get the house looking the way she wanted it.
A2 If something takes a particular quality, that quality is needed for it to happen.
necessitar de, precisar de
It takes courage to face life again after a serious accident.
A2 to swallow or use medicine
tomar
Take two tablets, three times a day.
B1 to remove something without asking someone
pegar, roubar
Someone’s taken my coat!
B1 to get hold of something and move it
tomar, pegar, tirar
He reached across and took the glass from her.
B1 used with some nouns to say that someone performs an action
fazer, tomar, dar
I need to take a shower. Take a look at this.
B1 to study a subject
estudar
He’s taking chemistry and physics.
B1 UK to wear a particular size of clothes
usar
I take a size 12.
B1 to accept something
pegar, aceitar
So, are you going to take the job?
take a picture, photograph, etc. A1 to photograph someone or something
tirar uma foto
I took some great photos of the kids.
take milk, sugar, etc. to usually add milk, sugar, etc. to your tea or coffee
pôr leite, acúcar, etc., tomar com leite, acúcar, etc.
Do you take sugar in your coffee?
I take it (that)… used when you think that what you say is probably true
imagino que…, suponho que…
I take it you’re not coming with us.
(Definition of take from the Cambridge English-Portuguese Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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