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Russian translation of “check”

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check

verb
 
 
/tʃek/
EXAMINE [I, T] A2 to examine something in order to make sure that it is correct or the way it should be
проверять
[+ (that)] I went to check that I'd locked the door. Have you checked your facts? I knelt down beside the body and checked for a pulse.Analysing and evaluatingAssessing and estimating valueProving and disproving
FIND OUT [I, T] B1 to find out about something
выяснять
[+ question word] I'll check whether Peter knows about the party.Analysing and evaluatingAssessing and estimating value
ASK [I] B2 to ask someone for permission to do something
просить разрешения
I'd like to stay overnight, but I need to check with my parents.Making appeals and requests
STOP [T] to stop something bad from increasing or continuing
останавливать, сдерживать
The government needs to find a way to check rising inflation.Limiting and restrictingPreventing and impeding
MARK [T] US ( UK tick) to put a mark by an answer to show that it is correct, or by an item on a list to show that you have dealt with it
отмечать галочкой
Signs, signals and symbolsSpecific signs and symbolsMarks and results
LEAVE [T] US to leave your coat, bags, or other possessions temporarily in someone's care
сдавать вещи (в багаж, камеру хранения и т. д.)
→  See also double-check Placing and positioning an object
(Definition of check verb from the Cambridge English-Russian Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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