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Russian translation of “fact”

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fact

noun
 
 
/fækt/
TRUE THING [C] A2 something that you know is true, exists, or has happened
факт, обстоятельство
I'm not angry that you drove my car, it's just the fact that you didn't ask me first. No decision will be made until we know all the facts. He knew for a fact (= was certain) that Natalie was lying.Reality and truthInformation and messages
REAL THINGS [U] B2 real events and experiences, not things that are imagined
истина, реальность
It's hard to separate fact from fiction in what she says.Reality and truth
in fact/in actual fact/as a matter of fact B1 used to emphasize what is really true
на самом деле, в действительности
I was told there were some tickets left, but in actual fact they were sold out.Intensifying expressions
B2 used when giving more information about something
в сущности, к тому же
"Is Isabel coming?" "Yes. As a matter of fact, she should be here soon."Reality and truth
the fact (of the matter) is B2 used to tell someone that something is the truth
по правде говоря
I wouldn't usually ask for your help, but the fact is I'm desperate.Reality and truth
Translations of “fact”
in Korean 사실, 실화…
in Arabic حَقيقة…
in French fait, réel…
in Italian fatto, realtà, verità…
in Chinese (Traditional) 現實,實際情況, (尤指)事實,真相…
in Turkish gerçek, olgu, hakikat…
in Polish fakt, fakty…
in Spanish hecho, realidad…
in Portuguese fato, fatos…
in German die Tatsache, die Wirklichkeit…
in Catalan fet…
in Japanese 事実, 現実…
in Chinese (Simplified) 现实,实际情况, (尤指)事实,真相…
(Definition of fact from the Cambridge English-Russian Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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