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Translation of "admit" - English-Spanish dictionary

admit

verb   /ədˈmɪt/ ( present participle admitting, past tense and past participle admitted)
B1 to agree that you did something bad, or that something bad is true admitir Both men admitted to taking illegal drugs. I was wrong – I admit it.
to allow someone to enter a place admitir It says on the ticket ‘admit 2’. No one will be admitted to the club without valid ID.
(Definition of admit from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

admit

verb /ədˈmit/ ( past tense, past participle admitted)
to say that one accepts as true admitir, reconocer He admitted (that) he was wrong.
to allow to enter admitir, permitir la entrada This ticket admits one person.
to take someone to hospital Ingresar The people involved in the traffic accident were admitted to (the) hospital.
admissible /-səbl/ adjective
(opposite inadmissible) allowable admisible Will this evidence be admissible in court?
admission /-ʃən/ noun
being allowed to enter; entry admisión They charge a high price for admission.
(an) act of accepting the truth of (something) confesión, reconocimiento an admission of guilt.
the process of taking someone to hospital for treatment Ingresar Accident and Emergency admissions.
admittance noun
the right or permission to enter entrada, permiso de entrada The notice said ’No admittance’.
admittedly adverb
as is generally accepted manifiestamente, declaradamente Admittedly, she is not well.
(Definition of admit from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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