after translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary

Translation of "after" - English-Spanish dictionary


preposition /ˈaːftə/
later in time or place than
después (de)
After 5 o’clock, we were free to go home.
following (often indicating repetition)
We had a lot of problems – it was one thing after another Night after night, the dogs’ barking kept us awake.
Shut the door after you!
in search or pursuit of
detrás de, tras
He ran after the bus.
después de
After all I’ve done, you’d think he’d thank me It’s disappointing to fail after all that work.
(American in telling the time) past
y (son las diez y cuarto)
It’s a quarter after ten.
after-effect /ˈaːftərɪˌfekt/ noun a bad effect that remains after taking a drug or after an unpleasant event such as an illness
Efectos Secundario
the after-effects of cancer treatment.
aftermath /-mӕθ/ noun the situation etc resulting from an important, especially unpleasant, event
The country is still suffering from the aftermath of the war.
aftershave /ˈaːftəˌʃeiv/ noun a liquid with a pleasant smell that men put on their faces
Locion aftershave
a bottle of aftershave.
aftertaste /ˈaˈftəˌteist/ noun a taste that stays in your mouth after you have eaten or drunk something
This wine has a strange aftertaste.
afterthought noun a later thought
pensamiento posterior
I only took my camera with me as an afterthought, but I was pleased that I did.
afterwards adverb later or after something else has happened or happens
después, posteriormente, a continuación
He told me afterwards that he had not enjoyed the film.
after all (used when giving a reason for doing something etc) taking everything into consideration
después de todo
I won’t invite him. After all, I don’t really know him.
in spite of everything that has/had happened, been said etc
a pesar de todo, a fin de cuentas
It turns out he went by plane after all.
be after to be looking for something
perseguir, buscar
What are you after? The police are after him.
(Definition of after from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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