after translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary

Translation of "after" - English-Spanish dictionary


preposition /ˈaːftə/
later in time or place than
después (de)
After 5 o’clock, we were free to go home.
following (often indicating repetition)
We had a lot of problems – it was one thing after another Night after night, the dogs’ barking kept us awake.
Shut the door after you!
in search or pursuit of
detrás de, tras
He ran after the bus.
después de
After all I’ve done, you’d think he’d thank me It’s disappointing to fail after all that work.
(American in telling the time) past
y (son las diez y cuarto)
It’s a quarter after ten.
after-effect /ˈaːftərɪˌfekt/ noun a bad effect that remains after taking a drug or after an unpleasant event such as an illness
Efectos Secundario
the after-effects of cancer treatment.
aftermath /-mӕθ/ noun the situation etc resulting from an important, especially unpleasant, event
The country is still suffering from the aftermath of the war.
aftershave /ˈaːftəˌʃeiv/ noun a liquid with a pleasant smell that men put on their faces
Locion aftershave
a bottle of aftershave.
aftertaste /ˈaˈftəˌteist/ noun a taste that stays in your mouth after you have eaten or drunk something
This wine has a strange aftertaste.
afterthought noun a later thought
pensamiento posterior
I only took my camera with me as an afterthought, but I was pleased that I did.
afterwards adverb later or after something else has happened or happens
después, posteriormente, a continuación
He told me afterwards that he had not enjoyed the film.
after all (used when giving a reason for doing something etc) taking everything into consideration
después de todo
I won’t invite him. After all, I don’t really know him.
in spite of everything that has/had happened, been said etc
a pesar de todo, a fin de cuentas
It turns out he went by plane after all.
be after to be looking for something
perseguir, buscar
What are you after? The police are after him.
(Definition of after from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day


a large group of soldiers who form a part of an army, especially the ancient Roman army

Word of the Day

There is no such thing as a true synonym in English. Discuss!
There is no such thing as a true synonym in English. Discuss!
by Kate Woodford,
November 25, 2015
In the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary the word ‘synonym’ is defined as ‘a word or phrase that has the same or nearly the same meaning as another word or phrase in the same language’. As you might expect, definitions for this word are broadly similar in other dictionaries and yet the italicized

Read More 

climatarian adjective
climatarian adjective
November 23, 2015
choosing to eat a diet that has minimal impact on the climate, i.e. one that excludes food transported a long way or meat whose production gives rise to CO2 emissions Climate change is not normally on people’s minds when they choose what to have for lunch, but a new diet is calling for

Read More