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Translation of "after" - English-Spanish dictionary

after

preposition   /ˈɑːf·tər/
A1 following something that has happened después de We went swimming after lunch.
A2 following in order después de H comes after G in the alphabet.
A2 once you have passed a particular place después de Turn left after the hotel.
B1 following someone or something detrás de We ran after him.
because of something that happened después de I’ll never trust her again after what she did to me.
although something happened or is true; despite después de I can’t believe he was so rude to you after all the help you gave him!
US used to say how many minutes past the hour it is y It’s five after three.
after all
B1 used to add an explanation to something that you have just said al fin y al cabo You can’t expect to be perfect – after all, it was only your first lesson.
day after day, year after year, etc.
B1 happening every day, year, etc., over a long period día tras día, año tras año, etc. We go to the same place on holiday year after year.
be after something
to be trying to get something estar buscando algo What type of job are you after?
conjunction   /ˈɑː·ftər/
B1 at a later time than something else happens or happened después de que We arrived after the game had started.
adverb   /ˈɑː·ftər/
A2 later than someone or something else después Hilary got here at midday and Matt arrived soon after.
(Definition of after from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

after

preposition /ˈaːftə/
later in time or place than después (de) After 5 o’clock, we were free to go home.
following (often indicating repetition) tras We had a lot of problems – it was one thing after another Night after night, the dogs’ barking kept us awake.
behind detrás Shut the door after you!
in search or pursuit of detrás de, tras He ran after the bus.
considering después de After all I’ve done, you’d think he’d thank me It’s disappointing to fail after all that work.
(American in telling the time) past y (son las diez y cuarto) It’s a quarter after ten.
after-effect /ˈaːftərɪˌfekt/ noun
a bad effect that remains after taking a drug or after an unpleasant event such as an illness Efectos Secundario the after-effects of cancer treatment.
aftermath /-mӕθ/ noun
the situation etc resulting from an important, especially unpleasant, event secuelas The country is still suffering from the aftermath of the war.
aftershave /ˈaːftəˌʃeiv/ noun
a liquid with a pleasant smell that men put on their faces Locion aftershave a bottle of aftershave.
aftertaste /ˈaˈftəˌteist/ noun
a taste that stays in your mouth after you have eaten or drunk something Regusto This wine has a strange aftertaste.
afterthought noun
a later thought pensamiento posterior I only took my camera with me as an afterthought, but I was pleased that I did.
afterwards adverb
later or after something else has happened or happens después, posteriormente, a continuación He told me afterwards that he had not enjoyed the film.
after all
(used when giving a reason for doing something etc) taking everything into consideration después de todo I won’t invite him. After all, I don’t really know him.
in spite of everything that has/had happened, been said etc a pesar de todo, a fin de cuentas It turns out he went by plane after all.
be after
to be looking for something perseguir, buscar What are you after? The police are after him.
(Definition of after from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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