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Spanish translation of “arm”

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arm

noun /aːm/
the part of the body between the shoulder and the hand
brazo
He has broken his arm.
anything shaped like or similar to this
brazo
She sat on the arm of the chair.
armful noun as much as a person can hold in one arm or in both arms
brazada, brazado
Maria was carrying an armful of flowers/clothes.
armband noun a strip of cloth etc worn round the arm
brazal, brazalete
They all wore black armbands as a sign of mourning.
armchair noun a chair with arms at each side
sillón, butaca
a reclining armchair.
armpit noun the hollow under the arm at the shoulder
axila, sobaco
sweaty armpits.
arm-in-arm adverb (of two or more people) with arms linked together
del brazo, de bracete
They were walked along the street, arm-in-arm.
keep at arm’s length to avoid becoming too friendly with someone
mantenerse a distancia
She tends to keep everybody at arm’s length.
with open arms with a very friendly welcome
con los brazos abiertos
He greeted them with open arms.
Translations of “arm”
in Korean 팔…
in Arabic ذِراع…
in French bras, accoudoir…
in Italian braccio…
in Chinese (Traditional) 身體部位, 臂,手臂, 上肢…
in Russian рука, рукав, подлокотник…
in Turkish kol, elbise kolu, sandalye…
in Polish ręka, ramię, rękaw…
in Portuguese braço…
in German der Arm, die Arm (lehne, …)…
in Catalan braç…
in Japanese (人間の)腕…
in Chinese (Simplified) 身体部位, 臂,手臂, 上肢…
(Definition of arm from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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