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Translation of "artist" - English-Spanish dictionary

artist

noun   /ˈɑː·tɪst/
A2 someone who makes art, especially paintings and drawings artista
(Definition of artist from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

artist

noun /ˈaːtist/
a person who paints pictures or is a sculptor or is skilled at one of the other arts artista a landscape/portrait artist.
a singer, dancer, actor etc; an artiste artista He announced the names of the artists who were taking part in the show.
artistic adjective
liking or skilled in painting, music etc artístico She draws and paints – she’s very artistic.
created or done with skill and good taste artístico That flower arrangement looks very artistic.
artistically adverb
artísticamente an artistically gifted child.
artistry noun
artistic skill maestría, arte, talento artístico the musician’s artistry.
artistic licence /aːˈtistik ˈlaisəns/ /aːrˈtistik ˈlaisəns/ noun ( artistic license)
the way in which artists or writers change facts in order to make their work more interesting or beautiful Licencía Artistica You have to allow for artistic licence.
(Definition of artist from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Translations of “artist”
in Korean 예술가…
in Arabic فَنّان…
in Malaysian pelukis, artis…
in French artiste…
in Russian художник…
in Chinese (Traditional) 藝術家, 美術家, 畫家…
in Italian artista…
in Turkish ressam…
in Polish artyst-a/ka…
in Vietnamese hoạ sĩ, nghệ sĩ…
in Portuguese artista…
in Thai ศิลปิน, นักแสดง, นักร้อง…
in German der/die Künstler(in)…
in Catalan artista…
in Japanese 芸術家, 画家…
in Chinese (Simplified) 艺术家, 美术家, 画家…
in Indonesian seniman, artis…
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