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Translation of "ask" - English-Spanish dictionary

ask

verb   /ɑːsk/
A1 to say something to someone as a question preguntar I asked him about his hobbies. I asked why the plane was so late.
A2 to invite someone to do something invitar She asked him to lunch.
ask someone to do something
B1 to say something to someone because you want them to do something pedir a alguien que haga algo They asked me to feed their cat while they were away.
B1 to say something to someone because you want to know if you can do something preguntar I asked if I could go. Ask your dad if you can come.
→  Phrasal verbs ask (someone) for something , ask someone out
(Definition of ask from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

ask

verb /aːsk/
to put a question preguntar He asked me what the time was Ask the price of that scarf Ask her where to go Ask him about it If you don’t know, ask.
to express a wish to someone for something pedir; preguntar por I asked her to help me I asked (him) for a day off He rang and asked for you Can I ask a favour of you?
to invite invitar He asked her to his house for lunch.
ask after phrasal verb
to make inquiries about the health etc of preguntar por, interesarse por She asked after his father.
ask for phrasal verb
to express a wish to see or speak to (someone) preguntar por, reclamar When he telephoned he asked for you He is very ill and keeps asking for his daughter.
to behave as if inviting (something unpleasant) buscar, buscársela Going for a swim when you have a cold is just as asking for trouble.
for the asking
you may have (something) simply by asking for it con sólo pedirlo The job is hers for the asking.
(Definition of ask from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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