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Translation of "bag" - English-Spanish dictionary

bag

noun   /bæɡ/
A1 a soft container made of paper, plastic, cloth, or other material, used for carrying things, especially things you have bought bolsa a paper bag a shopping bag a bag of apples I was carrying three bags of shopping.
A1 a strong container made of leather, plastic, or other material, usually with a handle, in which you carry personal things or things that you need for travelling maleta, bolsa de viaje I hadn’t even packed my bags (= put the things I need in bags).20991311
bags under your eyes
dark or loose skin under your eyes because of tiredness or old age ojeras 2098
(Definition of bag from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

bag

noun /bӕɡ/
a container made of soft material (eg cloth, animal skin, plastic etc) bolsa; bolso She was carrying a small bag a paper/plastic bag a shopping bag.
a quantity of fish or game caught partida (caza), cacería, captura Did you get a good bag today?
baggy adjective ( comparative baggier, superlative baggiest)
loose, like an empty bag que hace bolsa, holgado He wears baggy trousers.
bags of
(informal) a large amount of montones de She’s got bags of money.
in the bag
as good as done or complete (in the desired way) en el bote He thinks that the interview went well and that the job is in the bag.
bag lady noun
(informal ) a homeless woman who carries around with her all her belongings, usually in shopping bags mujer indigente Bag ladies often sleep on benches in public parks and train stations.
(Definition of bag from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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