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Translation of "bitter" - English-Spanish dictionary

bitter

adjective   /ˈbɪt·ər/
B1 having a strong, unpleasant taste amargo
angry and upset resentido She is still very bitter about the way she was treated.
very cold gélido
making you feel very unhappy or angry amargo Failing the test was a bitter disappointment for me.
noun [no plural]   /ˈbɪt·ər/ UK
a type of beer with a bitter taste cerveza amarga
(Definition of bitter from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

bitter

adjective /ˈbitə/
having a sharp, acid taste like lemons etc, and sometimes unpleasant amargo a bitter orange.
full of pain or sorrow amargo She learned from bitter experience He felt bitter disappointment at not being chosen for the team.
full of hatred or opposition, hostile hostil, encarnizado The two men were bitter enemies.
very cold helado a bitter wind.
bitterness noun
amargura She could taste the bitterness of the dark chocolate.
bitterly adverb
amargamente He was bitterly disappointed at not passing the test It was a bitterly cold day in November.
bittergourd noun
a long, fleshy, bitter-tasting fruit usually used as a vegetable. Fruta larga y carnosa de sabor amargo, que se utiliza normalmente como un vegetal
bittersweet adjective
(of an experience, feeling, or memory) happy and sad at the same time Agridulce Moving out of his parents’ house had been a bittersweet experience.
(of a smell or taste) both sweet and bitter at the same time Agridulce The wine had a strange bittersweet taste.
bitumen /ˈbitjumin/ noun
a black, sticky substance obtained from petroleum betún The road had been covered in bitumen.
bituminous /-ˈtjuːmi-/ adjective
bituminoso bituminous roofing.
(Definition of bitter from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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