bitter translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary

Translation of "bitter" - English-Spanish dictionary


adjective /ˈbitə/
having a sharp, acid taste like lemons etc, and sometimes unpleasant
a bitter orange.
full of pain or sorrow
She learned from bitter experience He felt bitter disappointment at not being chosen for the team.
full of hatred or opposition, hostile
hostil, encarnizado
The two men were bitter enemies.
very cold
a bitter wind.
bitterness noun
She could taste the bitterness of the dark chocolate.
bitterly adverb
He was bitterly disappointed at not passing the test It was a bitterly cold day in November.
bittergourd noun a long, fleshy, bitter-tasting fruit usually used as a vegetable.
Fruta larga y carnosa de sabor amargo, que se utiliza normalmente como un vegetal
bittersweet adjective (of an experience, feeling, or memory) happy and sad at the same time
Moving out of his parents’ house had been a bittersweet experience.
(of a smell or taste) both sweet and bitter at the same time
The wine had a strange bittersweet taste.
bitumen /ˈbitjumin/ noun a black, sticky substance obtained from petroleum
The road had been covered in bitumen.
bituminous /-ˈtjuːmi-/ adjective
bituminous roofing.
(Definition of bitter from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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