bottle translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "bottle" - English-Spanish dictionary

bottle

noun /ˈbotl/
a hollow narrow-necked container for holding liquids etc
botella
a lemonade bottle a bottle of ginger beer.
bottle bank noun (British) a container in a public place where people can leave empty bottles so that the glass can be recycled.
Contenedor de Vidrios
bottleneck noun a place where slowing down or stopping of traffic, progress etc occurs
embotellamiento
a bottleneck caused by roadworks.
bottle up phrasal verb to prevent (eg one’s feelings) from becoming obvious
reprimir
Don’t bottle up your anger.
Translations of “bottle”
in Arabic زُجاجة…
in Korean 병…
in Malaysian botol…
in French bouteille…
in Turkish şişe…
in Italian bottiglia…
in Chinese (Traditional) 容器, 瓶,瓶子, 嬰兒奶瓶…
in Russian бутылка…
in Polish butelka…
in Vietnamese chai lọ…
in Portuguese garrafa, frasco…
in Thai ขวด…
in German die Flasche…
in Catalan ampolla, flascó…
in Japanese 瓶(びん), ボトル…
in Indonesian botol…
in Chinese (Simplified) 容器, 瓶,瓶子, 婴儿奶瓶…
(Definition of bottle from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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