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Translation of "bring" - English-Spanish dictionary

bring

verb   /brɪŋ/ ( past tense and past participle brought)
A2 to take someone or something with you when you go somewhere traer Did you bring an umbrella with you? He brought me some flowers.
bring (someone) happiness, luck, peace, etc.
B1 to cause happiness, luck, peace, etc. traer alegría, suerte, paz, etc. (a alguien) She’s brought us so much happiness over the years.
→  Phrasal verbs bring something about , bring something off , bring something back , bring someone up , bring something up
(Definition of bring from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

bring

verb /briŋ/ ( past tense, past participle brought /broːt/)
to make (something or someone) come (to or towards a place) traer, llevar I’ll bring plenty of food with me Bring him to me!
to result in proporcionar, provocar, dar, causar This medicine will bring you relief.
bring about phrasal verb
to cause provocar, causar, ocasionar His disregard for danger brought about his death.
bring back phrasal verb
to (cause to) return devolver; traer (a la memoria), recordar She brought back the umbrella she had borrowed Her singing brings back memories of my mother.
bring down phrasal verb
to cause to fall derribar, tirar abajo The storm brought several trees down.
bring home to
to prove or show (something) clearly to (someone) hacer ver, abrir los ojos, mostrar con claridad His illness brought home to her how much she depended on him.
bring off phrasal verb
to achieve (something attempted) lograr, conseguir, obtener They brought off an unexpected victory.
bring round phrasal verb
to bring back from unconsciousness reanimar, hacer volver en sí The fresh air brought him round after he had fainted.
bring up phrasal verb
to rear or educate educar Her parents brought her up to be polite.
to introduce (a matter) for discussion sacar a colación, sacar a relucir, presentar Bring the matter up at the next meeting.
bring towards the speaker: Mary, bring me some coffee. take away from the speaker: Take these cups away. fetch from somewhere else and bring to the speaker: Fetch me my book from the bedroom.
(Definition of bring from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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