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Spanish translation of “carbon”

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carbon

/ˈkaːbən/
(chemistry ) (symbol C) an element occurring as diamond and graphite and also in coal etc
carbono
radioactive carbon.
carbon copy noun ( plural carbon copies) a copy of writing or typing made by means of carbon paper
copia (hecha con papel carbón)
a carbon copy of the document.
carbon dioxide /daiˈoksaid/ noun (chemistry) a gas present in the air, breathed out by man and other animals
dióxido de carbono
Carbon dioxide is released into the atmosphere when carbon-containing fossil fuels are burned in air.
carbon footprint /ˈkaːbən ˈfutˌprint/ noun a measure of the amount of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere by the activities of a person, organization etc
Huella de Carbono
The company is committed to reducing its carbon footprint.
carbon monoxide /məˈnoksaid/ noun (chemistry) a colourless/colorless, very poisonous gas which has no smell
monóxido de carbono
Carbon monoxide is given off by car engines.
carbon paper noun a type of paper coated with carbon etc which makes a copy when placed between the sheets being written or typed.
papel carbón
carbon sink noun an area of the natural environment, such as a forest or an ocean, that absorbs large amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and thereby offsets the emission of greenhouse gases produced elsewhere
Sumidero de Carbono
The oceans are by far the largest carbon sink in the world.
Translations of “carbon”
in Korean 탄소…
in Arabic كَربون…
in French carbone…
in Italian carbonio…
in Chinese (Traditional) 物質, 碳…
in Russian углерод…
in Turkish karbon…
in Polish węgiel…
in Portuguese carbono…
in German der Kohlenstoff…
in Catalan carbó…
in Japanese 炭素…
in Chinese (Simplified) 物质, 碳…
(Definition of carbon from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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