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Spanish translation of “cat”

cat

noun /kӕt/
a small, four-legged, fur-covered animal often kept as a pet
gato
a Persian/Siamese cat.
a large wild animal of the same family (eg tiger, lion etc)
felino
the big cats.
catty adjective (comparative cattier, superlative cattiest) spiteful, malicious
malicioso
She’s catty even about her best friend catty remarks.
catcall noun a shrill whistle showing disagreement or disapproval
silbido
The minister was greeted by catcalls from the crowd. .
catfish noun (plural catfish) any of a family of scaleless fish with long feelers round the mouth.
bagre
catgut noun a kind of cord made from the intestines of sheep etc , used for violin strings etc.
cuerda de tripa
Catseye noun (trademark ) (British) a small, thick piece of glass fixed in the surface of a road to reflect light and guide drivers at night.
catadióptico
catsuit noun a woman’s close-fitting one-piece trouser suit
prenda ajustada que cubre todo el cuerpo
The singer was wearing a bright pink catsuit.
cattail noun a tall plant that grows in wet places, with flowers shaped like a cat’s tail.
tifácea, espadaña
catwalk noun a long stage that models walk along at a fashion show
Pasarela
(also adjective) She’s a catwalk model.
a narrow structure for people to walk on, built high up on the inside or outside of a building.
Pasarela
let the cat out of the bag to let a secret become known unintentionally
irse de la lengua
We wanted it to be a surprise birthday party for her, but someone let the cat out of the bag.
(Definition of cat from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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