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Spanish translation of “charge”

charge

verb /tʃaːdʒ/
to ask as the price (for something)
cobrar
They charge 50 cents for a pint of milk, but they don’t charge for delivery.
to make a note of (a sum of money) as being owed
poner en la cuenta
Charge the bill to my account.
(with with) to accuse (of something illegal)
acusar
He was charged with theft.
to attack by moving quickly (towards)
cargar contra, embestir, arremeter
We charged (towards) the enemy on horseback.
to rush
irrumpir
The children charged down the hill.
to make or become filled with electricity
cargar
Please charge my car battery.
to make (a person) responsible for (a task etc)
cargar
He was charged with seeing that everything went well.
charged adjective (of a situation or subject) filled with or causing a strong emotion such as anger, excitement, or nervousness
Cargada
You could sense the highly charged atmosphere of the courtroom as the verdict was announced.
charger noun formerly, a horse used in battle
corcel
an Arab charger.
charge card noun a plastic card provided by a shop/store which you can use to buy goods there and pay for them at a later time
Tarjeta de Crédito
I used my charge card to pay for the tools.
in charge of responsible for
responsable de
I’m in charge of thirty men.
in someone’s charge in the care of someone
al cuidado de
You can leave the children in his charge.
take charge (with of) to begin to control, organize etc
hacerse cargo de algo
The department was in chaos until he took charge (of it).
(with of) to take into one’s care
encargarse de
The policeman took charge of the gun.
(Definition of charge from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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