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Spanish translation of “close”

close

verb /kləuz/
to make or become shut, often by bringing together two parts so as to cover an opening
cerrar
The baby closed his eyes Close the door The shops close on Sundays.
to finish; to come or bring to an end
terminar
The meeting closed with everyone in agreement.
to complete or settle (a business deal)
concluir
We’re hoping to close the deal later today.
closed circuit television noun (also CCTV) a system of cameras that allows you to see what is happening within a limited area, such as a building or street, in order to protect it from crime
Circuito Cerrado de Televisión
The suspect was captured on closed-circuit television.
closed question noun a closed question is one in which all possible answers are identified and the person answering the question has to choose one of them. A multiple-choice question or a question that can only be answered ‘yes’ or ‘no’ are examples closed questions
Pregunta Cerrada
The advantage of using closed questions in a questionnaire is that the involve the minimum effort on the part of the respondent.
closed shop noun a business, factory, or office where all the employees must be members of a particular trade union/labor union
Taller Cerrado
The factory was a closed shop where union membership was mandatory.
close down phrasal verb (of a business) to close permanently
cerrar( definitivamente)
High levels of taxation have caused many firms to close down.
(of a TV or radio station etc) to stop broadcasting for the day (noun closedown).
cerrar la emisión
close up phrasal verb to come or bring closer together
acercar
He closed up the space between the lines of print.
to shut completely
cerrar
She closed up the house when she went on holiday/vacation.
(Definition of close from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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