coach translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Translation of "coach" - English-Spanish dictionary

coach

noun   /kəʊtʃ/
A2 UK a comfortable bus used to take groups of people over long distances autocar a coach trip
B1 someone who gives lessons, especially in a sport entrenador, -ora a tennis coach
A2 UK a comfortable bus used to take groups of people over long distances autocar a coach trip
verb   /kəʊtʃ/
to give someone lessons, especially in a sport or school subject entrenar, preparar
coaching noun [no plural] /ˈkəʊ·tʃɪŋ/
entrenamiento, preparación
(Definition of coach from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

coach

noun /kəutʃ/
(British ) a railway carriage; car(American) vagón The last two coaches of the train were derailed.
(British ) a bus for tourists etc autocar (also adjective) a coach tour.
a trainer in athletics, sport etc entrenador a tennis coach.
a private teacher profesor particular They employed a coach to help their son with his mathematics.
a four-wheeled horsedrawn vehicle carruaje a coach and horses.
coaching noun
the process of training someone to improve the skills they require for a particular sport, job, or activity Entrenamiento Personal tennis coaching.
the process of teaching someone the skills they need to perform well in an important examination Entrenamiento Personal exam coaching.
coachbuilder noun
a person or business concerned with building the bodies for modern vehicles. carrocero
coachman noun ( plural coachmen)
the driver of a horsedrawn carriage. cochero
(Definition of coach from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

More translations of “coach” in Spanish

A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
by ,
May 04, 2016
by Kate Woodford We can’t always focus on the positive! This week, we’re looking at the language that is used to refer to arguing and arguments, and the differences in meaning between the various words and phrases. There are several words that suggest that people are arguing about something that is not important. (As you might

Read More 

Word of the Day

droid

a robot (= a machine controlled by computer) that is made to look like a human

Word of the Day

trigger warning noun
trigger warning noun
May 02, 2016
a warning that a subject may trigger unpleasant emotions or memories This is not, I should stress, an argument that trigger warnings should become commonplace on campus.

Read More