compare translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "compare" - English-Spanish dictionary

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compare

verb /kəmˈpeə/
to put (things etc) side by side in order to see to what extent they are the same or different
comparar
If you compare his work with hers you will find hers more accurate This is a good essay compared with your last one.
to describe as being similar to
comparar
She compared him to a greedy pig.
to be near in standard or quality
compararse
He just can’t compare with Mozart.
comparable /ˈkompərəbl/ adjective of the same kind, on the same scale etc
comparable
The houses were not at all comparable in size.
comparative /kəmˈpӕrətiv/ adjective judged by comparing with something else
relativo
the comparative quiet of the suburbs.
(linguistics) (of an adjective or adverb used in comparisons) between positive and superlative, as the following underlined words
comparativo
a bigger book a better man Blacker is a comparative adjective (also noun) What is the comparative of ’bad’?
comparatively adverb
relativamente
This house was comparatively cheap.
comparison /kəmˈpӕrisn/ noun (an act of) comparing
comparación
There’s no comparison between Beethoven and pop music Living here is cheap in comparison with London.
compare with is used to bring out similarities and differences between two things of the same type: He compared his pen with mine and decided mine was better. compare to is used when pointing out a similarity between two different things: Stars are often compared to diamonds.
(Definition of compare from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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