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Translation of "complete" - English-Spanish dictionary

complete

adjective   /kəmˈpliːt/
B1 with all parts completo the complete works of Oscar Wilde
B1 used to make what you are saying stronger total The meeting was a complete waste of time.
verb   /kəmˈpliːt/ ( present participle completing, past tense and past participle completed)
A2 to finish doing or making something terminar The palace took 15 years to complete.
A2 to provide the last part needed to make something whole completar Complete the sentence with one of the adjectives provided.
A2 to write all the necessary details on a form or other document rellenar Have you completed your application yet?
(Definition of complete from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

complete

adjective /kəmˈpliːt/
whole; with nothing missing completo a complete set of Shakespeare’s plays.
thorough completo My car needs a complete overhaul a complete surprise.
finished acabado My picture will soon be complete.
completely adverb
completamente I am not completely satisfied with the way things worked out.
completeness noun
plenitud He’s checking the completeness of the list to make sure that we haven’t missed anything.
completion /-ʃən/ noun
finishing or state of being finished finalización You will be paid on completion of the work.
(Definition of complete from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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