corner translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary
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Translation of "corner" - English-Spanish dictionary

corner

noun /ˈkoːnə/
a point where two lines, walls, roads etc meet
esquina; rincón
the corners of a cube the corner of the street.
a place, usually a small quiet place
rincón
a secluded corner.
in football/soccer, a free kick from the corner of the field
córner, saque de esquina
We’ve been awarded a corner.
cornered adjective having (a given number of) corners
de (…) picos
a three-cornered hat.
forced into a position from which it is difficult to escape
acorralado
A cornered animal can be very dangerous.
cut corners to use less money, effort, time etc when doing something than was thought necessary, often giving a poorer result
escatimar en algo, aplicar la ley del mínimo esfuerzo, atajar
The builders clearly tried to cut corners when they built this house.
turn the corner to go round a corner
doblar la esquina
She turned the corner and drove along the High Street.
to get past a difficulty or danger
salir del apuro, haber pasado ya lo peor/el momento crítico
He was very ill, but he’s turned the corner now.
(Definition of corner from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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