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Translation of "cost" - English-Spanish dictionary

cost

noun   /kɒst/
A2 the amount of money that you need to buy or do something coste, precio The cost of rail travel is terrible.
at all costs
If something must be done at all costs, it is very important that it is done. a todo coste We have to succeed at all costs.
verb   /kɒst/ ( past tense and past participle cost)
A2 If something costs a particular amount of money, you have to pay that in order to buy or do it. costar How much do these shoes cost? It costs $5 to send the package by airmail.
to cause someone to lose something valuable costar Drinking and driving costs lives (= can cause death). His affairs cost him his marriage.
cost an arm and a leg
to be extremely expensive valer un riñón I’d love to buy a new car, but they cost an arm and a leg.
(Definition of cost from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

cost

verb /kost/ ( past tense, past participle cost)
to be obtainable at a certain price costar This jacket costs 75 dollars The victory cost two thousand lives.
(past tense, past participle costed) to estimate the cost of (a future project) calcular el coste de The caterer costed the reception at three hundred dollars.
costly adjective ( comparative costlier, superlative costliest)
costing much costoso, caro a costly wedding-dress.
costliness noun
alto precio; suntuosidad the costliness of running a car.
costs noun plural
the expenses of a legal case costas He won his case and was awarded costs of $500.
at all costs
no matter what the cost or outcome may be a toda costa We must prevent disaster at all costs.
(Definition of cost from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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