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Spanish translation of “custom”

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custom

noun /ˈkastəm/
what a person etc is in the habit of doing or does regularly
costumbre
It’s my custom to go for a walk on Saturday mornings religious customs.
the regular buying of goods at the same shop etc; trade or business
clientela
The new supermarkets take away custom from the small shops.
customary adjective habitual; usually done etc
costumbre
It is customary to eat turkey for Christmas dinner.
customarily adverb
habitualmente
They customarily receive more than $30 a month in tips.
customer noun a person who buys from a shop etc
cliente
our regular customers.
used jokingly for a person
tipo
He’s certainly a strange customer.
customize verb ( (also customiseBritish)) to change something so that it is exactly what you want or need
Personalizar
The software allows you to customize the appearance on-screen to suit your own needs.
customs noun plural (the government department that collects) taxes paid on goods coming into a country
(derechos de) aduana
Did you have to pay customs on those watches? He works for the customs (also adjective) customs duty.
the place at a port etc where these taxes are collected
aduana
I was searched when I came through customs at the airport.
Translations of “custom”
in Korean 관습…
in Arabic عادة, عُرْف…
in French habitude, clientèle…
in Italian usanza…
in Chinese (Traditional) 傳統, 風俗,習俗…
in Russian обычай, покупатели, клиентура…
in Turkish gelenek, âdet, örf…
in Polish obyczaj, zwyczaj, klienci…
in Portuguese costume…
in German der Brauch, die Kundschaft…
in Catalan costum…
in Japanese 習慣…
in Chinese (Simplified) 传统, 风俗,习俗…
(Definition of custom from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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