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Spanish translation of “dead”

dead

adjective /ded/
without life; not living
muerto
a dead body Throw out those dead flowers.
not working and not giving any sign of being about to work
desconectado, cortado
The phone/engine is dead.
absolute or complete
total, completo
There was dead silence at his words He came to a dead stop.
deaden verb to lessen, weaken or make less sharp, strong etc
amortiguar
The nurse gave him an injection to deaden the pain.
deadly adjective (comparative deadlier, superlative deadliest) causing death a deadly poison. very great
absolutamente
He is in deadly earnest (= He is completely serious).
very dull or uninteresting
aburridísimo
What a deadly job this is.
dead end noun a road closed off at one end.
callejón sin salida
dead-end adjective leading nowhere
sin salida
a dead-end job.
dead heat noun a race, or a situation happening in a race, in which two or more competitors cross the finishing line together
empate
The race ended in a dead heat.
dead language noun a language no longer spoken, eg Latin.
lengua muerta
deadline noun a time by which something must be done or finished
fecha límite
Monday is the deadline for handing in this essay.
deadlock noun a situation in which no further progress towards an agreement is possible
punto muerto, impasse
Talks between the two sides ended in deadlock.
to set a deadline (not dateline) for finishing a job.
(Definition of dead from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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