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Spanish translation of “death”

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death

noun /deθ/
the act of dying
muerte
There have been several deaths in the town recently Most people fear death.
something which causes one to die
muerte
Smoking too much will be the death of him.
the state of being dead
muerte
Her eyes were closed in death.
deathly adjective, adverb as if caused by death a deathly silence It was deathly quiet. death bed noun the bed in which a person dies
lecho de muerte
He had converted to Catholicism while on his death bed.
death certificate noun an official piece of paper signed by a doctor stating the cause of someone’s death.
partida de defunción
death penalty noun ( plural death penalties) the legal punishment of being killed for a very serious crime
Pena de Muerte
He faces the death penalty for committing murder.
at death’s door on the point of dying
en las puertas de la muerte
When they found him, he was practically at death’s door.
catch one’s death (of cold) to get a very bad cold
pillar una galipandria
If you go out in that rain without a coat, you’ll catch your death (of cold).
put to death to cause to be killed
ejecutar
In the old days, criminals were put to death by hanging.
to death very much
a muerte
I’m sick to death of you.
Translations of “death”
in Korean 죽음…
in Arabic مَوْت, وَفاة…
in French mort, décès…
in Italian morte…
in Chinese (Traditional) 死,死亡…
in Russian смерть…
in Turkish ölüm, ebdiyete intikal…
in Polish śmierć…
in Portuguese morte…
in German der Tod…
in Catalan mort…
in Japanese 死…
in Chinese (Simplified) 死,死亡…
(Definition of death from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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