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Translation of "degree" - English-Spanish dictionary

degree

noun   /dɪˈɡriː/
A2 a unit for measuring temperatures or angles, shown by the symbol ° written after a number grado
B1 a qualification that proves you have completed a course of study at a college or university grado, título He has a degree in physics.
an amount or level of something grado There was some degree of truth in what she said.
(Definition of degree from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

degree

noun /diˈɡriː/
(an) amount or extent grado There is still a degree of uncertainty This job requires a high degree of skill.
(physics) a unit of temperature grado 20° (= 20 degrees) Celsius.
(mathematics) a unit by which angles are measured grado at an angle of 90° (= 90 degrees).
a title or certificate given by a university etc título He has a degree in chemistry.
by degrees
gradually poco a poco, gradualmente, paulatinamente We reached the desired standard of efficiency by degrees.
to a degree
to a small extent hasta cierto punto I agree with you to a degree, but I have doubts about your conclusions.
(Definition of degree from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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