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Spanish translation of “die”

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die

verb /dai/ ( present participle dying /ˈdaiiŋ/, past tense, past participle died)
to lose life; to stop living and become dead
morir
Those flowers are dying She died of old age.
to fade; to disappear
apagarse, desaparecer
The daylight was dying fast.
to have a strong desire (for something or to do something)
morirse de ganas de
I’m dying for a drink I’m dying to see her.
diehard noun a person who resists new ideas
conservador
(also adjective) a diehard socialist.
die away phrasal verb to fade from sight or hearing
desvanecerse, apagarse, amainar
The sound died away into the distance.
die down phrasal verb to lose strength or power
extinguirse, apagarse, irse apagando
I think the wind has died down a bit.
die hard to take a long time to disappear
tardar en desaparecer
Old habits die hard.
die off phrasal verb to die quickly or in large numbers
morir uno por uno, ir muriendo
Herds of cattle were dying off because of the drought.
die out phrasal verb to cease to exist anywhere
perderse, extinguirse
The custom died out during the last century.
Translations of “die”
in Korean 죽다…
in Arabic يَموت…
in French mourir, disparaître, avoir une envie folle de…
in Italian morire…
in Chinese (Traditional) 死去,死亡,過世, 停止運轉,報廢…
in Russian умирать…
in Turkish ölmek…
in Polish umierać…
in Portuguese morrer…
in German sterben, verschwinden, sehnen…
in Catalan morir…
in Japanese 死ぬ…
in Chinese (Simplified) 死去,死亡,过世, 停止运转,报废…
(Definition of die from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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