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Translation of "distil" - English-Spanish dictionary

distil

verb (-ll-) mainly UK ( US usually distill)   /dɪˈstɪl/
to make a liquid stronger or purer by heating it until it changes to a gas and then cooling it so that it changes back into a liquid destilar Some strong alcoholic drinks such as whisky are made by distilling.121
distillation noun   /ˌdɪs.tɪˈleɪ.ʃən/
(Definition of distil from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

distil

verb /diˈstil/ ( past tense, past participle distilled)
to get (a liquid) in a pure state by heating to steam or a vapour and cooling again destilar Diesel fuel is made by distilling crude oil at high temperature under atmospheric pressure.
to obtain alcoholic spirit from anything by this method destilar Whisky is distilled from barley.
distillate noun
something that has been formed by a process of distillation. Destilado
distillation noun
destilación
distiller noun
a person or firm that distils and makes spirits destilador a firm of whisky distillers.
distillery noun ( plural distilleries)
a place where distilling (of whisky, brandy etc) is done. destilería
distilled water noun
water that has had many of its impurities removed through a process of distillation. Agua Destilada
(Definition of distil from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Translations of “distil”
in Vietnamese chảy nhỏ giọt, chưng cất…
in Malaysian suling, menyuling…
in Thai กลั่น, สกัด…
in French distiller…
in German destillieren, brennen (aus)…
in Chinese (Simplified) 液体, 蒸馏…
in Turkish damıtmak…
in Russian дистиллировать…
in Indonesian menyuling…
in Chinese (Traditional) 液體, 蒸餾…
in Polish destylować…
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