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Spanish translation of “duty”

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duty

noun /ˈdjuːti/ ( plural duties)
what one ought morally or legally to do
deber
He acted out of duty I do my duty as a responsible citizen.
an action or task requiring to be done, especially one attached to a job
obligación
I had a few duties to perform in connection with my job.
(a) tax on goods
impuesto
You must pay duty when you bring wine into the country.
dutiable adjective (of goods) on which tax is to be paid
sujeto a derechos de aduana
Dutiable goods imported to Brunei are subject to customs import duties.
dutiful adjective (opposite undutiful) careful to do what one should
obediente
a dutiful daughter.
duty-free adjective free from tax
libre de impuestos
duty-free wines.
off duty not actually working and not liable to be asked to do so
no estar de guardia
The doctor’s off duty this weekend (adjective (etc)) She spends her off-duty hours at home.
on duty carrying out one’s duties or liable to be asked to do so during a certain period
estar de guardia, estar de servicio
I’m on duty again this evening.
Translations of “duty”
in Korean 의무, 임무…
in Arabic واجِب…
in French devoir, obligation, taxe…
in Italian dovere…
in Chinese (Traditional) 責任, 義務…
in Russian долг, обязанность, налог…
in Turkish iş, görev, sorunluluk…
in Polish obowiązek, cło…
in Portuguese dever, obrigação…
in German die Pflicht, die Aufgabe, der Zoll…
in Catalan deure…
in Japanese 義務, 職務…
in Chinese (Simplified) 责任, 义务…
(Definition of duty from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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