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Translation of "emphasis" - English-Spanish dictionary

emphasis

noun /ˈemfəsis/ ( plural emphases /-siːz/)
stress put on certain words in speaking etc; greater force of voice used in words or parts of words to make them more noticeable énfasis In writing we sometimes underline words to show emphasis.
force; firmness énfasis ’I do not intend to go,’ he said with emphasis.
importance given to something importancia, énfasis He placed great emphasis on this point.
emphasize verb ( (also emphasiseBritish))
to lay or put emphasis on enfatizar, subrayar You emphasize the word ’too’ in the sentence ’Are you going too?’ He emphasized the importance of working hard.
emphatic /-ˈfӕ-/ adjective
(opposite unemphatic) expressed with emphasis; firm and definite enfático, enérgico an emphatic denial He was most emphatic about the importance of arriving on time.
emphatically adverb
enérgicamente, en tono enfático He emphatically refused to be interviewed.
to emphasize (not emphasize on) a point.
(Definition of emphasis from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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