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Translation of "fail" - English-Spanish dictionary

fail

verb   /feɪl/
A2 to not pass a test or an exam suspender I’ve just failed my driving test.
to not be successful fracasar Dad’s business failed after just three years.
→  Opposite succeed
fail to do something
to not do what is expected no hacer algo He failed to turn up for football practice yesterday.
to stop working normally, or to become weaker fallar The brakes failed and the car crashed into a tree.
(Definition of fail from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

fail

verb /feil/
to be unsuccessful (in); not to manage (to do something) fracasar They failed in their attempt I failed my exam I failed to post the letter.
to break down or cease to work fallar The brakes failed.
to be insufficient or not enough fallar, faltar His courage failed (him).
(in a test, examination etc) to reject (a candidate) suspender The examiner failed half the class.
to disappoint fallar, decepcionar They did not fail him in their support.
failing noun
a fault or weakness defecto, fallo, punto débil He may have his failings, but he has always treated his children well.
failure /-jə/ noun
the state or act of failing fracaso, suspenso, corte She was upset by her failure in the exam the failure of the electricity supply.
an unsuccessful person or thing fracasado He felt he was a failure.
inability, refusal etc to do something incapacidad I was disappointed by his failure to reply.
without fail
definitely or certainly sin falta I shall do it tomorrow without fail.
(Definition of fail from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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