far translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary

Translation of "far" - English-Spanish dictionary


adverb /faː/
indicating distance, progress etc
How far is it from here to his house?
at or to a long way away
She went far away/off.
very much
She was a far better swimmer than her friend (was).
faraway adjective distant
remoto, lejano
faraway places.
not paying attention; dreamy
She had a faraway look in her eyes.
far-fetched adjective very unlikely
inverosímil, improbable
a far-fetched story.
far-off adjective a long distance away
remoto, alejado
a far-off land.
a long time ago
remoto, alejado
the far-off days of his childhood.
far-reaching adjective affecting or influencing a large number of people
de amplio alcance, dificil de alcanzar
far-reaching consequences.
far-sighted adjective having an understanding of the effect that an action will have in the future
con visión de futuro
a far-sighted policy/investment.
(American ) unable to see things clearly when they are close to you; long-sighted (British)
as far as to the place or point mentioned
We walked as far as the lake.
(also so far as) as great a distance as
He did not walk as far as his friends.
(also so far as) to the extent that
en cuanto a
As far as I know, she is doing well.
by far by a large amount
mucho, con mucho
They have by far the largest family in the village.
far and away by a very great amount
con mucho, con diferencia
She is far and away the cleverest girl in the class!
far from not only not, but
lejos de
Far from liking him, I hate him.
not at all
He was far from helpful.
so far until now
hasta ahora
So far we have been quite successful.
up to a certain point
hasta cierto punto
We can only get so far without further help.
(Definition of far from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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