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Translation of "figure" - English-Spanish dictionary

figure

noun /ˈfiɡə, (American) ˈfiɡjər/
the form or shape of a person figura A mysterious figure came towards me That girl has got a good figure.
a (geometrical) shape figura The page was covered with a series of triangles, squares and other geometrical figures.
a symbol representing a number cifra, número a six-figure telephone number.
a diagram or drawing to explain something diagrama The parts of a flower are shown in figure 3.
figurative /-rətiv/ adjective
of or using figures of speech figurado figurative language.
figuratively adverb
figuradamente, metafóricamente The word is being used figuratively in this sentence.
figurehead noun
a person who is officially a leader but who does little or has little power títere She is the real leader of the party – he is only a figurehead.
an ornamental figure (usually of carved wood) attached to the front of a ship. figura de proa
figure of speech noun
one of several devices (eg metaphor, simile) for using words not with their ordinary meanings but to make a striking effect. figura retórica
figure out phrasal verb
to understand comprender I can’t figure out why he said that.
(Definition of figure from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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