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Translation of "follow" - English-Spanish dictionary

follow

verb   /ˈfɒl·əʊ/
A2 to move behind someone or something and go where they go seguir She followed me into the kitchen.
B1 to happen or come after something seguir There was a bang, followed by a cloud of smoke.
follow a path/road
B1 to travel along a path or road seguir un camino/una carretera Follow the main road down to the traffic lights.
follow instructions/orders
B1 to do what instructions or orders say you should do seguir instrucciones/órdenes Did you follow the instructions on the packet?
B1 to understand something seguir el hilo (de) Could you say that again? I didn’t quite follow.
as follows
used to introduce a list or description el/lo(s) siguiente(s) The main reasons are as follows.
(Definition of follow from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

follow

verb /ˈfoləu/
to go or come after seguir I will follow (you).
to go along (a road, river etc) seguir Follow this road.
to understand entender, seguir Do you follow (my argument)?
to act according to seguir I followed his advice.
follower noun
a person who follows, especially the philosophy, ideas etc of another person seguidor He was a follower of Plato (= Plato’s theories).
following noun
supporters seguidores He has a great following among the poorer people.
follow-up noun
further reaction or response seguimiento Was there any follow-up to the letter you wrote to the newspaper?
follow up phrasal verb
to go further in doing something seguir The police are following up a clue.
to find out more about (something) seguir I followed up the news.
(Definition of follow from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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