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Translation of "fresh" - English-Spanish dictionary

fresh

adjective /freʃ/
newly made, gathered, arrived etc fresco fresh fruit (= fruit that is not tinned, frozen etc) fresh flowers.
another; different; not already used, begun, worn, heard etc nuevo, reciente a fresh piece of paper fresh news.
(of weather etc) cool; refreshing fresco a fresh breeze fresh air.
(of water) without salt dulce The swimming pool has fresh water in it, not sea water.
(of people etc) healthy; not tired fresco You are looking very fresh this morning.
freshen verb
to become fresh or cool refrescar The wind began to freshen.
(often with up) to (cause to) become less tired or untidy looking refrescarse I must freshen up before dinner.
fresher noun
(British) a student who has just started his/her first term at a university. estudiante de primer año, novato
freshly adverb
newly; recently recién freshly gathered plums They had freshly arrived from Manchester.
freshman noun ( plural freshmen)
(American) a student who is in his/her first year at university. estudiante de primer año, novato
freshwater adjective
of inland rivers or lakes; not of the sea agua dulce freshwater fish.
(Definition of fresh from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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