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Translation of "globe" - English-Spanish dictionary

globe

noun /ɡləub/
(usually with the) the Earth globo I’ve travelled to all parts of the globe. a ball with a map of the Earth on it. globo terráqueo an object shaped like a globe globo, esfera The chemicals were crushed in a large metal globe. global adjective affecting the whole world global, universal, mundial Pollution is a global problem India, the largest banana producing country in the world, is vying for a bigger share of the global market. globalize verb ( also globalise (British)) (especially of a business) to operate or spread all over the world globalizar The company was founded 127 years ago and then globalized its business over the years. globalization noun ( also globalisation (British)) globalización the globalization of commerce. global village noun the world thought of as a small place, because modern communication allow fast and efficient contact even to its remote parts. aldea global global warming noun a gradual increase in the temperature of the Earth’s atmosphere, widely believed to be caused by the greenhouse effect calentamiento global the effects of global warming. globally adverb globalmente globular /ˈɡlobjulə/ adjective shaped like a globe. globular globule /ˈɡlobjuːl/ noun a small drop of a liquid or sticky substance glóbulo Globules of sweat were running down his face. globetrotter noun a person who goes sight-seeing all over the world. trotamundos globetrotting noun viajar alrededor del mundo
(Definition of globe from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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