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Translation of "great" - English-Spanish dictionary

great

adjective   /ɡreɪt/
A1 very good genial We had a great time.
A2 large grande a great crowd of people A great number of buildings were damaged in the flood.
B1 extreme grande, mucho He has great difficulty walking.
important or famous grande a great actor
great big
very big enorme He has a great big house.
prefix   /ɡreɪt/
great-grandfather/-grandmother
the father or mother of your grandfather or grandmother bisabuelo/bisabuela
great-aunt/-uncle
the aunt or uncle of your mother or father tía abuela/tío abuelo
great-grandchild, -granddaughter, etc.
the child, daughter, etc. of your grandson or granddaughter bisnieto, bisnieta, etc.
great-niece/-nephew
the daughter or son of your niece or nephew sobrina nieta/sobrino nieto
(Definition of great from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

great

adjective /ɡreit/
of a better quality than average; important grande, gran (antes del nombre), importante a great writer Churchill was a great man.
very large, larger etc than average grande, gran (antes del nombre) a great crowd of people at the football match.
of a high degree mucho; especial Take great care of that book.
very pleasant maravilloso, espléndido, fantástico We had a great time at the party.
clever and expert excelente, buenísimo John’s great at football.
greatly adverb
muy I was greatly impressed by her singing.
greatness noun
grandeza, importancia She was given the award in recognition of her greatness as an athlete.
(Definition of great from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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