hall translate English to Spanish: Cambridge Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Translation of "hall" - English-Spanish dictionary

hall

noun   /hɔːl/
A2 a room that leads to other rooms vestíbulo Her office is at the end of the hall.
A2 a large room or building where meetings, concerts, etc. happen sala, auditorio The concert was held in Carnegie Hall. a college lecture hall (= one that can hold a large number of students)
Town Hall/City Hall
the building where a town or city government is based ayuntamiento The mayor’s office is in City Hall.
( also hall of residence) a building where university or college students live residencia universitaria
used in the names of buildings where college students live residencia universitaria I live in Ashton Hall.
(Definition of hall from the Cambridge English-Spanish Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

hall

noun /hoːl/
a room or passage at the entrance to a house vestíbulo, entrada We left our coats in the hall.
(a building with) a large public room, used for concerts, meetings etc sala a community hall.
a building with offices where the administration of a town etc is carried out ayuntamiento a town hall the city hall (American).
a passageway through a building; a corridor. pasillo, corredor
a building of a university, college etc, especially one in which students etc live residencia, colegio mayor Do you live in halls?
hallmark noun
a mark put on gold and silver articles to show the quality of the gold or silver sello You can see the hallmark on the handle of the knife.
hall of residence noun
(British) a college or university building provided for students to live in. dormitorio universitario
hallway noun
a hall or passage vestíbulo The two men were standing in the hallway.
(Definition of hall from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Luckily, no one was hurt. (Adverbs for starting sentences)
Luckily, no one was hurt. (Adverbs for starting sentences)
by ,
June 29, 2016
by Kate Woodford This week we’re looking at adverbs that we use to introduce sentences. We’ll begin with a set of adverbs that we use to show we are grateful for something that happened. Starting with a very common adverb, fortunately often introduces a sentence in which the speaker talks about a good thing that happened,

Read More 

Word of the Day

bae

someone you love; a boyfriend or girlfriend

Word of the Day

creeping obesity noun
creeping obesity noun
June 27, 2016
obesity which results from incremental weight gain over a number of years More than just a holiday glow: Experts reveal taking a vacation can actually save your LIFE (but there is still a risk of ‘creeping obesity’)

Read More