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Spanish translation of “hook”

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hook

noun /huk/
a small piece of metal shaped like a J fixed at the end of a fishing-line used for catching fish etc
anzuelo
a fish-hook.
a bent piece of metal etc used for hanging coats, cups etc on, or a smaller one sewn on to a garment, for fastening it
gancho
Hang your jacket on that hook behind the door hooks and eyes.
in boxing, a kind of punch with the elbow bent
gancho
a left hook.
hooked adjective curved like a hook
ganchudo
a hooked nose.
(with on) slang for very interested in, or showing a great liking for; addicted to
colgado
He’s hooked on modern art He’s hooked on marijuana.
hooker noun (in rugby) a player whose job is to get the ball out of a scrum with his foot.
hooker
(American, informal) a prostitute.
prostituta
by hook or by crook by some means or another; in any way possible
cueste lo que cueste
I’ll get her to marry me, by hook or by crook.
off the hook free from some difficulty or problem
libre de problemas
If he couldn’t keep the terms of the contract, he shouldn’t have signed it – I don’t see how we can get him off the hook now.
Translations of “hook”
in Korean 갈고리…
in Arabic خُطّاف…
in French hameçon, crochet, agrafe…
in Italian gancio, uncino…
in Chinese (Traditional) 裝置, 鉤子,掛鉤…
in Russian крючок…
in Turkish çengel, kanca…
in Polish hak, haczyk…
in Portuguese gancho, anzol…
in German der Angelhaken, der Haken…
in Catalan ganxo, ham…
in Japanese フック, 鉤(かぎ)…
in Chinese (Simplified) 装置, 钩子,挂钩…
(Definition of hook from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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