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Spanish translation of “imagine”

imagine

verb /iˈmӕdʒin/
to form a mental picture of (something)
imaginar
I can imagine how you felt.
to see or hear etc (something which is not true or does not exist)
imaginar(se)
Children often imagine that there are frightening animals under their beds You’re just imagining things!
to think; to suppose
imaginar, suponer
I imagine (that) he will be late.
imaginable adjective used to emphasize that something is the most extreme that can be imagined
imaginable
He suffered the worst pain imaginable.
used to emphasize that something includes every possible example of a particular thing
imaginable
The book has recipes for every imaginable type of cake.
imaginary adjective existing only in the mind or imagination; not real
imaginario
A unicorn is an imaginary creature Her illnesses are usually imaginary.
imagination noun (the part of the mind which has) the ability to form mental pictures
imaginación
I can see it all in my imagination.
the creative ability of a writer etc
imaginación
This story shows a lot of imagination.
the seeing etc of things which do not exist
imaginación
There was no-one there – it was just your imagination.
imaginative /-nətiv, (American) -neitiv/ adjective (opposite unimaginative) having, or created with, imagination
imaginativo
an imaginative writer This essay is interesting and imaginative.
(Definition of imagine from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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